THE PEOPLE ARE FINALLY HEARD IN OHIO

A U.S. federal court has ruled that Ohio can now enact a law that was written seven long years ago, but was put on hold because of litigation. The law requires all young ladies under the age of 18 to obtain parental consent before being able to procure an abortion. She may also get permission from a judge. As well, all women seeking an abortion in the state of Ohio must attend a consultation with her family doctor within 24 hours of the procedure. This is indeed an American decision, but its reasoning is applicable to our society as well, and the dispute illustrates the insincerity of those who oppose any type of control on this procedure.

The bill has been held up in the courts by the infamous American Civil Liberties Union. The question that we must ask now is why? This bill in no way infringes on a woman’s right to have an abortion. It simply requires that the procedure and its inherent medical risks be explained to each patient, as well as other alternatives to the invasiveness of abortion, so that she can make an informed decision. Truly all should applaud such a move, as those who are going through the hard time and making the hard decisions are being given as much information as they can possibly be given. Only one with a personal stake in the abortion industry could deny this obvious benefit. In this country, I can’t even go to see a podiatrist without a referral from my family physician.

As expected, the ACLU has also argued that this law takes away a woman’s right and places it in the hands of her parents. Actually, these are young girls who are not even able to vote, let alone sign off on their health and high risk medical procedures. If a young woman’s body is her own at this age, why do we deny her the privilege of consuming alcohol? Over time and through countless studies, the age of consent and reason has been determined by a general consensus, and has usually started at 18 years of age. From another angle, one could applaud the court that handed down this decision, that being the U.S. District Court of Cincinnati. It is nice to see a small piece of parental power being reinstated instead of the constant erosion that we are so accustomed to seeing by the judicial branch of government.

Finally, some sanity is starting to surface and rhetoric is being pushed aside. It is a hopeful sign.

Reason has started to make a comeback.